Good columnists/correspondents to read from World War II?

I look at the paper from 80 years ago from the Library of Congress’ newspaper archive. It has the Washington, D.C. Evening Star and I enjoy reading George Fielding Eliot’s analysis pieces (Eliot was a major during the First World War), and I especially like Grantland Rice’s sports columns.

Are there other names to keep an eye out for?

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Here are some of my favorites:

  • Ernie Pyle
  • Raymond Clapper
  • Westbrook Pegler
  • Helen Kirkpatrick
  • Florence Fisher Parry (Pittsburgh Press)
  • Dorothy Thompson
  • Maj. Al Williams
  • Maj. Alexander P. de Seversky

…among others. There’s far too many to choose from :smile:

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Even the First Lady had a column:

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Forgot to mention Mrs. Walter Ferguson, though I have some personal disagreements with her columns at times:

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I’m familiar with Seversky, but none of these names have come up yet after two years of reading. Herbert Hoover has written a couple pieces “this week,” but the titles didn’t sound very appealing so I kept scanning ahead. I’ll keep my eyes peeled for the others you’ve mentioned. Thanks!

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I suggest looking at The Pittsburgh Press and other papers’ archives. You might even see some familiar names, like Walter Cronkite.

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I transcribe Ernie Pyle’s columns in this forum:

…along with some of the others, like this one from Westbrook Pegler:

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I’ll definitely check out that paper. One thing I’ve discovered by reading old newspapers is why they called the New York Times the “paper of record.” The writing was very good and they covered so much. Not to get political, and newspapers had their problems back then too, but journalism today isn’t even a shadow of what it once was. And today’s writing is so terribly sloppy, even in the big publications.

I haven’t seen Cronkite yet either, but it is neat to see historical figures when they were young. Like Robin Olds, the famous Vietnam-era fighter pilot. He is about to graduate from West Point and was a big-time football player. And his dad was well-known, part of the bomber mafia.

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Speaking of which…

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Some of the articles from the Times had the problem of being a little too wordy, however.

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There were also historical figures who continued on with their lives at this point, and those who passed away during the war:

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Yeah I think this week in 1943 his squadron was embarked on a cargo ship and sailing across the Pacific with their PT boats riding on top.

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WOW!!! What a resource! Thanks for this - amazing work!

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Alan Moorehead - attached to 8th Army - is an excellent resource.
I’d highly recommend his book “Road to Tunis” giving a first hand account of what being an Allied WW2 war correspondent entailed.

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