The World War 2 Obscure Trivia Thread


#103

Yeah, I agree. I wish they’d used a fictional character instead of Ludendorff. They could have done some amalgamation of Hutier, Ludendorff, and von Lettow-Vorbeck and given him some ashamedly German sounding name instead of making a straw man of the quartermaster general.


#104

I’ll gladly help with that. How about a two part:

  1. What was the nickname of one the most successful US navy sub skippers?
  2. What was his boat’s name?

#105

I remember the name of the boat. Was it USS Wahoo? Remembered it because it was a wacky name for a boat, can’t recall the name of the skipper though


#106

Yep, the Wahoo. There’s a memorial for her in Wahoo, NE (my home state).

Best hint I can give for the skipper’s nickname is that he resembled a Moon Mullins character.


#107

This hint escapes me as I haven’t heard of what Moon Mullins is before. Did a google search and I also found that it ceased publication before I was even born :laughing:


#108

Cmd. Dudley W. “Mush” Morton. Earned the nickname “Mushmouth” due to looking a bit like the square jawed cartoon character.

The memorial for his boat (in front of the county courthouse in Wahoo, NE):

No relation between the name of the boat and the name of the town, but that didn’t stop them from putting up a memorial any more than it stopped them from being the “home office” of the Late Show.


#109

Next one, what’s the relationship between a renowned American car maker located in Singapore at the outbreak of the Pacific war, a tiger and a rabbit?


#110

Well, here’s General Yamashita, the Tiger of Malaya.

Here’s General Arthur Percival, or Rabbit as he was slightly unkindly known behind his back.

And here they are signing the surrender of Singapore at the Ford Malaya plant in Singapore.


#111

I was going to ask if the torpedo was still live but if it’s an early war example, it probably wouldn’t matter.

http://www.historynet.com/us-torpedo-troubles-during-world-war-ii.htm


#112

Which common kitchen item contains a piece of of war winning technology?


#113

The microwave oven? :confused:


#114

What was ‘Gardening’?


#115

Or more specifically, the cavity magnetron. Allowed the allies to produce centimetric wavelength radar sets which could do things like spot a U boat periscope or map out the terrain underneath a bomber.


#116

Damn it, I’ve heard that somewhere. Was it something to do with mine sweeping?


#118

Yeah… nah. <very warm>


#119

I’m trying to resist the temptation to google it. Didn’t the RAF put some kind of magnetic ring thing underneath a Wellington bomber to detect mines if it flew over them? Is that it?


#120

They did, but no, you’ve got the wrong end of the stick. It’s the RAF code for undertaking mine laying operations.


#121

Which two Axis military units in the European theatre fought on after the German surrender?


#122

I notice that you say Axis not German. Is this an Eastern European country taking on the Soviets?


#124

Western Europe. But there’s a link with the USSR… :wink: