Letters from readers (5-15-41)

The Pittsburgh Press (May 15, 1941)

Says mothers of U.S. do not feel sorry for selves

Editor, The Pittsburgh Press:

I would like to answer Cecil B. DeMille’s Mother’s Day Message in last Sunday’s “This Week” section of the Press. I am a mother with a grown son.

Mothers are not going out of “fashion.” We are just changing our type of mothers as we are changing so many things today. Mothers of today are teaching their children to be realists, not sentimentalists. The fact that a woman has happened to become a mother does not glorify her in the eyes of the world. Everyone has had a mother, therefore, they are no novelty. Mothers today do not wish to be placed upon a pedestal and worshiped. They want to be loved – not from a sense of duty, but because they have earned that love as well as respect.

A child owes his mother nothing for bringing him into this world – in fact, I feel we own him so much that we can never quite pay the debt, because of the joy he gives us. It is the way in which she carries out her task of being a mother that should be the basis for love, honor, respect.

Perhaps we are not as busy with household tasks as our mothers were and so have had more time to be a companion to our children. The point I am trying to make is this: I do not know of a Mother under 50 who wouldn’t give all the pedestals in the world for the honor of being, just once, one of the gang. Being loved as a pal and adviser all the year 'round is so much more “soul satisfying” than being placed on a pedestal one day of the year.

So you see, Mr. DeMille, we mothers of today do not feel sorry for ourselves. We are quite content.

SYLVIA STURDEVANT
918 Morton St.
New Castle, PA


‘U.S. stands where it did in 1917’

Editor, The Pittsburgh Press:

In the days that have passed during this awful war in Europe, I sit down and begin wondering where we as Americans stand in this nightmare. When I speak of Americans, I speak of the common people in our fair land who will be the most affected by this holocaust of war. The folks who have sons and sweethearts, who must do the dying and suffering while their loved ones back home have to put up with their high taxes and their ration cards.

It is then I realize where we stand, we stand in exactly the same spot we stood 24 years ago; we stand holding the bag, the bag of broken hearts and dreams, the bag of unemployment, back-breaking taxes and the loss of our liberty.

I ask the people of America, is it all worthwhile? Why is it that our destinations are so closely linked with that of Europe? Why are 99% of us here in America? For no other reason than we wanted to leave such a state of affairs behind and live like human beings.

But we haven’t a chance, the seeds of propaganda have been well sown by the greatest group of salesmen in the world, the British statesmen. They have sold our leaders on the idea of selling us down the river, sold down the blood-clotted stream for a promise of fool’s gold, gold that we will break our backs with in taxes and sweat, gold that will break our hearts when our sons and sweethearts are led like sheep to slaughter to the tune of a military air by the band marching down the streets.

Yes, I repeat, we have been sold a gold brick, a brick that will eventually be the millstone that is tied around our neck when we are thrown into the whirlpool of European intrigue which was sold to us by the supersalesmen of the world – our so-called cousins, the British propagandists.

Sir Gilbert Parker, one of their aces in the last war, said of the American people:

They are the most gullible sheep in the world, excepting the Chinese.

Well said, Sir Gilbert, the people of America thank you.

C. W. KENNEDY


About Roosevelt’s stomach ailment

Editor, The Pittsburgh Press:

I read in your paper that our beloved President has stomach trouble. He eats too much terrapin à la Maryland. If he had to live on $29 pension as I have to do, he would not have any stomach sickness. He promised to have the old age pension extended if elected again but all his promises are going with the wind after he is elected.

GEORGE FRANKE
513 Merchant St.


Steadfastness seen lacking in Lindy

Editor, The Pittsburgh Press:

If my memory serves me right, it was only a few years ago that Charles A. Lindbergh gave up his residence in the United States, as a protest against the invasion of his personal liberty, and sought refuge in England. When the war clouds gathered in Europe, he returned to this country, evidently with the conviction that it was the securest anchorage in days of storm. Perhaps a very wise decision, but not one that testifies to his consistency, nor is it an example to those Americans who have never wavered in their loyalty to their country.

In view of Lindbergh’s past record of instability, he hardly appears qualified to speak for the great mass of American citizens. In days of great stress, we must look for leadership only from those whose steadfastness has been proven, and who will not abandon their country, however justifiable the cause.

In France, in Holland, in Belgium, and in Norway, we must remember, it was a small minority who could not place love of country above personal selfish interests that caused the betrayal of their fatherland. Is it difficult to imagine that the individuals that constituted these minorities were also devoted members of organizations similar in character to the American First Committee?

RICHARD B. TUCKER
Grant Bldg.


Favors ‘all-out effort’ before it is 'too late’

Editor, The Pittsburgh Press:

The American public has been treated to innumerable speeches and articles over the radio and in the newspapers and magazines by those who knowingly or unwittingly play Hitler’s game in America, though they claim to believe in “America First.” Every day, we read what the “experts” Lindbergh, Wheeler and Nye have to tell the people.

I listened recently to a young Frenchman on the radio. He had just arrived from France. His analysis of the causes of the war and the menace totalitarianism constitutes for any democracy in any part of the world was so clear and convincing that one wonders why a vociferous group should be permitted to obstruct the policy of our administration.

We know that English defeat spells American disaster. We know that with England we can lick the Hitler-Mussolini-Stalin combination. Why can’t we stand united behind F.D.R. and the Republicans Stimson, Knox and Willkie? We have to declare ourselves today for an all-out effort because tomorrow may be too late.

I wish the young Frenchman’s experiences of why France faltered were repeated a thousand times all over our land, for everyone to hear.

CORRINNE MORSE
7500 Kelly St.

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