Letters from readers (1-12-42)

The Pittsburgh Press (January 12, 1942)

’Redeem Pearl Harbor’ termed better battle cry

Editor, the Pittsburgh Press:

“Remember the Maine” and “Remember Pearl Harbor,” the battle cry of 1898 and 1941 to catch the imagination of the people. The phraseology of the two are twins but there the analogy abruptly ends. It will take more than the sacrifice of a heroic skeleton force of U.S. fighting men to wipe from history’s pages the shame of Pearl Harbor.

I, for one, would like to forget this catastrophe, due to neglect, incompetence and a two-by-four diplomacy of appeasement. Let’s either forget Pearl Harbor or change our battle cry to, “Redeem Pearl Harbor.”

All-out for defense, yes, a billion dollars a week. That amount of money is so vast that if paid in gold it would reduce Fort Knox to an empty cave in less than a year. However, the American people are not pikers and, if necessary, they would underwrite an expenditure of a billion dollars a day to insure their liberty. The U.S. fighting men are and always have been tops. And that also goes for the American people in supporting our defense with dollars and efforts.

But woe unto the political termites who, for their own aggrandizement and vote-pulling, undermine our safety and well being. This is no time for politics at the expense of the taxpayers who are asked to give all and make countless sacrifices for our war time defense. Out with the political pork barrel and the swine that feed at it, if we are to survive the onslaught of the mongrel yellow race and the greatest of all insults to the monkey of Darwin’s evolution theory – the paroxysmal Hitler.

Former Ambassador Gerard once told the Kaiser that in America there were 500,000 lamp posts to take care of an equal number of German reservists if they moved to sabotage our war efforts. Just in case, these same posts could be used for Fifth Columnists and political buccaneers if they try any funny business.

BRADY W. OVERTURF
203 Hahnes Court
DuBois, PA


Mr. Stiffey speaks out on economic rights

Editor, the Pittsburgh Press:

We hear and read about underprivileged persons and classes, even of submerged classes. How can that be in a land of equal rights?

Of what avail are equal political rights without equal economic rights? Are they not just a disappointment, a mockery? If men are endowed by their Creator with “equal rights to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness,” does not that logically and necessarily imply their equal rights to the means of life provided by their Creator; the equal right to live upon and use the earth, the fount of life, the source of all wealth?

If that be true, if it be good sense and good logic, then it creates a good theory. A good theory should be put to use, should be put into practice. If a theory be right its practice will inevitable be just and right.

The right is always the expedient.

Then why stutter and stammer and make excuses? Why not give to mankind their God-given rights in and to the earth?

The land by right belongs to the people of a nation who in the providence of God came to occupy it. The first deed, the best deed, the only deed backed by sufficient authority is recorded in Scripture.

The heavens are mine saith the Lord but the earth have I given to the children of men.

It is also write large in the Book of Nature. Is it just this little coterie of landlords who now hold title to the vast resources of these United States who constitute the children of men? Are all the rest of us mere aliens and trespassers somehow hurled unbidden on this planet with no rights therein? Are you so utterly stupid and devoid of sense, independence and courage as to believe that?

If so, joy go with you.

Ephraim is joined to his idols, let him alone.

Go on, neglect, forget and despise your rights and work out your salvation as now, by brute force, by the caveman’s club – the strike. You have equal political rights. By the intelligent use of the ballot it is possible to allow you equal economic rights. It might be wise and prudent to do so. Better than that the constant industrial warfare you now engage in.

R. W. STIFFEY
Coraopolis, PA


Memos on tire numbers should be compulsory

Editor, the Pittsburgh Press:

In regards to the very probable theft and bootlegging of auto tires by petty and criminal thieves, I suggest that you use your paper to have a law effective immediately for all motorists to register the serial numbers of their tires; that it shall be unlawful for a sale or purchase of a used tire until its identity is proven.

I am a carpenter and builder, 51 years of age, the fourth generation of Americans, am working on defense housing now. I have a record of the serial numbers of my tires. If one or more of them are stolen I am going to ask the Press to list same.

WALTER HARPER
1016 Franklin St.