Editorial: She'll learn (4-14-41)

The Pittsburgh Press (April 14, 1941)

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SHE’LL LEARN
By Mrs. Walter Ferguson

A college girl, Marjorie Myers, has pitched an incendiary bomb into adult circles with this statement:

Marriage should not necessarily demand sexual activity or constancy, but should be a kind of business arrangement.

How cocksure and how ignorant these children are! There’s no sense in getting steamed up over their pontifications, however, because life will change their minds for them all too soon.

By the time she falls in love, Marjorie, who has reached the advanced age of 19, will rearrange her codes and probably, after she’s been a wife a few years, will have become a stickler for Victorian marriage ethics. No matter how many diet fads she follows, eventually she’ll have to eat her words. We all do.

And apt as she may be, the modern co-ed has not yet studied under Old Man Experience, the last and most able instructor.

I know a young woman expecting her first baby who solemnly vows she will not let herself become too attached to the infant, because she considers parental infatuation a vain and foolish emotion harmful to everyone concerned. One can only smile inwardly when the young things hold forth in this fashion. And pity them a little.

They are so innocent of sorrow, so unacquainted with grief; they know so very little about love that has ripened to maturity.

What the co-eds do not realize is that, when marriage codes do not demand sexual fidelity, women may as well throw up the sponge and go back to their mental dark corners. Their imagination is undeveloped and so they have no way of knowing how passion will grip and rend them and how they will be mauled and mangled by their emotions.

To one capable of love, the day always comes when the thought of marriage being a business arrangement flip-flops the heart and brings on panic of the soul.

However, to class Miss Myers’ statement with salacious literature seems gross exaggeration. It more nearly resembles a criticism of the Einstein theory by a pert five-year-old.

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